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Cressy Quarantine Facility

Work has commenced on the construction of a quarantine facility at the Cressy Intensive Management Facility for Tasmanian Devils. The new biosecure quarantine area comprises 14 animal pens able to house devils of an unknown health status without impacting on the healthy captive population in the existing facility, from which it will operate independently.
Published: 23/07/2015

Peninsula Devil Conservation Project

The Save the Tasmanian Devil Program’s Peninsula Devil Conservation Project (previously known as the Tasman Isolation Project) is working to secure a DFTD-free population of devils on the Forestier and Tasman Peninsulas in south-east Tasmania.
Published: 23/07/2015

Tasmanian devil vaccine field trials announced

As part of the Wild Devil Recovery Project, 19 devils have received a vaccine against the Devil Facial Tumour Disease and will be released into Narawntapu National Park in Northern Tasmania in September this year.
Published: 22/07/2015

Contraception project update

In 2014 the Meta-population Advisory Committee (MAC) endorsed the use of contraceptive implants as a form of population control in female Tasmanian devils. The project is continuing in 2015 with the aim of assessing the effectiveness of contraception implants in female Tasmanian devils in Free Range Enclosures (FREs) and on Maria Island.
Published: 22/07/2015

Save the Tasmanian Devil Program Annual Report 2013-2014 released

The Save the Tasmanian Devil Program (STDP) has just published its Annual Program Report, which outlines how, with guidance from national and international specialists and support from funding partners, the Program is working towards the vision of an enduring and ecologically functional population of devils in the wild in Tasmania.
Published: 15/07/2015

Save the Tasmanian Devil Program moves closer to immunised devil trial

Now in its third five year phase, the focus of the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program has shifted from ensuring the species survival in captivity to recovery in the wild, and an exciting announcement made about research into a vaccine has brought this closer to reality.
Published: 25/02/2015

The Devil Program’s next five year Business Plan released

The Save the Tasmanian Devil Program (STDP) is now commencing its third stage, coinciding with a five year business planning cycle, and has outlined the goals and targets for the coming five years in its latest Business Plan 2014-19. A major emphasis during this period, beyond maintaining the Insurance Population, will be on wild devil management and the implementation of the recovery plan. Key steps will be to determine the status and trends of wild devil populations and to develop techniques for managing diseased populations. By the end of this period, the Program plans to be managing diseased populations in the wild in Tasmania.
Published: 13/02/2015

Response to STDP final performance review and future recommendations

An evaluation by the Federal government of the performance of the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program (STDP) against the goals set out in the STDP Business Plan 2008-13, was undertaken in early 2013. The aims were to evaluate the impacts and achievements of the Program, and identify potential legacy contributions to the longer term Program goals. Copies of the final report and the Program's response to its recommendations are provided here.
Published: 06/01/2015

Maria Island Devil Translocation Project Update, December 2014

The establishment phase of the Maria Island Devil Translocation Project has been successfully completed with 28 devils released over two years and evidence that the introduced population has bred successfully over the 2013 and 2014 breeding seasons. The focus is now on monitoring the devils, along with the potential impacts of the expanding population on other native species and the Island's ecology.
Published: 23/12/2014

Tasmanian Devil Contraception Trial shows Early Promise

A reproductive contraception trial for Tasmanian devils has been underway to develop a tool that will help conservation scientists to maintain the genetic diversity of Tasmanian devils in isolated and captive populations, benefiting the species survival in the long term. Tasmanian devils at two captive facilities in NSW and Tasmania have been the subject of the contraception trials and the early results look promising.
Published: 02/12/2014

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